Kevin Walker

Choose any product category you like. Now, quick! Name the top five brands in the category. Hard to do isn’t it? If you picked Japanese cars, you’d quickly name Toyota and Honda. But you’d stumble on naming the number three brand. Four and five would be even harder. If you’re in North America and your product category is packaged jams and jellies, you’d also be able to quickly name Stouffer’s and Welch’s as the top two brands. But very few of us know the third most popular brand and the fourth brand is almost unknown. The point is, these days, there are so many brands kicking around, in every category, in every country, in every price range, that we’re all drowning in brand soup. To cope, our brains start editing for us, without our approval or even our permission. Read more.

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Back in the ’60s, Al Ries and Jack Trout created the idea of positioning. They championed the notion that a business needs to “occupy” a certain position in the customer’s mind. That way, the customer will immediately think of the business whenever they have a need that it can satisfy. Sounds pretty basic, doesn’t it? But back when the Beatles were the hottest young band on the radio, it was a pretty radical notion. Today, the idea that you need to achieve market position is taken as a given. Pretty much all business people, certainly all marketers, aspire to it. But, in an ideal situation, positioning alone is not enough. People need a shortcut to access that position in their minds. And, oddly enough, it’s the Beatles who can teach us something about that.
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Kevin Walker

Kevin Walker

Delivers profitable #branding solutions for small and middle-market #business.